anthonyedwardstarks:

During rehearsals, Brad Pitt and Edward Norton found out that they both hated the new Volkswagen Beetle with a passion, and for the scene where Tyler and The Narrator are hitting cars with baseball bats, Pitt and Norton insisted that one of the cars be a Beetle. As Norton explains on the DVD commentary, he hates the car because the Beetle was one of the primary symbols of 60s youth culture and freedom. However, the youth of the 60s had become the corporate bosses of the 90s, and had repackaged the symbol of their own youth, selling it to the youth of another generation as if it didn’t mean anything. Both Norton and Pitt felt that this kind of corporate selling out was exactly what the film was railing against, hence the inclusion of the car; “It’s a perfect example of the Baby Boomer generation marketing its youth culture to us. As if our happiness is going to come by buying the symbol of their youth movement, even with the little flower holder in the plastic molding. It’s appalling to me. I hate it.” 

(via somewhereoncoastlines)


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neptunain:

remember when children used to say “i know you are but what am i” bc never in my adult life have i found an incident where that phrase is more appropriate

(via misandry-mermaid)


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Tumblr brilliance of the day.

Tumblr brilliance of the day.


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Some things are funnier as ideas, less so as actual things people actually did (via There is a fine line between behavioral science and being a sick mutha, ya know? - Imgur)

Some things are funnier as ideas, less so as actual things people actually did (via There is a fine line between behavioral science and being a sick mutha, ya know? - Imgur)


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Clara S. Foltz (July 16, 1849  September 2, 1934) was the first female lawyer on the U.S. West Coast. She is credited as the first person to propose creating a public defender’s office (in 1893, quite a while after the Sixth Amendment was ratified).

In 1880, Foltz moved to San Francisco. Not satisfied with being a San Francisco attorney, Foltz became a leader in the woman’s voting rights movement. During a career that spanned 56 years, Foltz almost single-handedly pushed a great deal of progressive legislation for women’s rights in the voting and legal fields. She spoke for the Republicans during the campaigns of 1880, 1882, and 1884. In 1886 she became a Democrat, and in the winter of that year lectured in Wisconsin, Illinois, and Iowa.
At the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893, during a “congress” of the Board of Lady Managers, Foltz introduced her idea of the public defender, with a speech entitled “Rights of Persons Accused of Crime — Abuses Now Existing.” Foltz’s then-radical concept of providing assistance to indigent criminal defendants is used today throughout the United States. She also created a similar model for the California Parole System.
Her many other trail-blazing accomplishments included becoming the first female clerk for the State Assembly’s Judiciary Committee (1880); the first woman appointed to the State Board of Corrections; the first female licensed Notary Public; the first woman named director of a major bank; and, in 1930, the first woman to run for Governor of California, at the age of 81.

See also:
"Public Defenders — Rights of Persons Accused of Crime — Abuses Now Existing,” Clara S. Foltz, Albany Law Journal, August 1893.
"Clara Shortridge Foltz: Pioneer in the Law," Mortimer D. Schwartz, Susan L. Brandt, and Patience Milrod, Hastings Law Journal, January 1976.
"Women Defenders in the West" (PDF file), Barbara Allen Babcock, Nevada Law Journal, Spring 2001.

Clara S. Foltz (July 16, 1849  September 2, 1934) was the first female lawyer on the U.S. West Coast. She is credited as the first person to propose creating a public defender’s office (in 1893, quite a while after the Sixth Amendment was ratified).

In 1880, Foltz moved to San Francisco. Not satisfied with being a San Francisco attorney, Foltz became a leader in the woman’s voting rights movement. During a career that spanned 56 years, Foltz almost single-handedly pushed a great deal of progressive legislation for women’s rights in the voting and legal fields. She spoke for the Republicans during the campaigns of 1880, 1882, and 1884. In 1886 she became a Democrat, and in the winter of that year lectured in Wisconsin, Illinois, and Iowa.

At the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893, during a “congress” of the Board of Lady Managers, Foltz introduced her idea of the public defender, with a speech entitled “Rights of Persons Accused of Crime — Abuses Now Existing.” Foltz’s then-radical concept of providing assistance to indigent criminal defendants is used today throughout the United States. She also created a similar model for the California Parole System.

Her many other trail-blazing accomplishments included becoming the first female clerk for the State Assembly’s Judiciary Committee (1880); the first woman appointed to the State Board of Corrections; the first female licensed Notary Public; the first woman named director of a major bank; and, in 1930, the first woman to run for Governor of California, at the age of 81.

See also:

"Public Defenders — Rights of Persons Accused of Crime — Abuses Now Existing,” Clara S. Foltz, Albany Law Journal, August 1893.

"Clara Shortridge Foltz: Pioneer in the Law," Mortimer D. Schwartz, Susan L. Brandt, and Patience Milrod, Hastings Law Journal, January 1976.

"Women Defenders in the West" (PDF file), Barbara Allen Babcock, Nevada Law Journal, Spring 2001.


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I have been mortal, and some part of me is mortal yet. I am full of tears and hunger and the fear of death, though I cannot weep, and I want nothing, and I cannot die. I am not like the others now, for no unicorn was ever born who could regret… — Peter S. Beagle, The Last Unicorn (1968)

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I don’t have a strong opinion on the Scottish independence issue, being neither Scottish nor British, but I love this photo: “Pro-independence campaigners Sandy and Ed Hastings pose wearing traditional Highland dress in Edinburgh, Scotland, on September 16, 2014.” (Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images) (h/t Paul)

I don’t have a strong opinion on the Scottish independence issue, being neither Scottish nor British, but I love this photo: “Pro-independence campaigners Sandy and Ed Hastings pose wearing traditional Highland dress in Edinburgh, Scotland, on September 16, 2014.” (Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images) (h/t Paul)


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handsomedogs:

"A dog is a man’s best friend."

handsomedogs:

"A dog is a man’s best friend."


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